Brewess

The Blog for Women Who Brew Beer

Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

Recipes for beer.

My Next Beer: Kolsch #12

Posted by Maggie on July 1, 2010

This is what I will be brewing next week for a three gallon batch:

  • 2 lbs Gambrinus Organic Pale Ale Malt (Barley)
  • 2 lbs Organic DME
  • Hops:  1/2 oz. Cascade at 60 minutes, 1/2 oz. Liberty at 10 minutes
  • Yeast:  White Labs Kolsch

Usually I use 1 lb barley and 3 lbs DME.   I’ll see how this comes out.  I got a larger pot, 16 quarts,  to make this so I can have more water and the larger bag of barley.

My beer stocks will be low after the family 4th of July gathering.  I’m glad that #8 is gone and I can bring my in-laws delicious #9 and super-delicious #10!  Both of my brother-in-laws used to brew beer but much stronger than I am making.  They were into stouts and dark, bitter, experimental ales.  Whew – I could barely drink that stuff!  They liked it.  I am sure my beer would taste too meek for them.  Who knows.  My father-in-law likes it.  Last time he visited he asked for a few bottles to bring back with him.  That was nice.

Last night I somewhat replaced food with beer.  I was home late from work, stopped at a friend’s to pick up my daughter, drank some wine.  By the time I got home it was 8:45 and who wants to cook dinner then?  So I had a beer and some pita chips and humus.  Great combination.

Posted in Discussion, Recipes | Leave a Comment »

Kolsch Ale #11

Posted by Maggie on June 12, 2010

This is what I am brewing right now.  This will be a three gallon batch.  It smells great while boiling away on the stove.

  • Specialty Malts:  1 lb. Pale Ale  (Organic)
  • Malt  Extract: 3 lbs. Pale DME (Organic)
  • Hops:  .5 oz Amarillo and .5 oz. Cascade at 60 minutes.  .5 oz. Liberty at 10 minutes.
  • Yeast: Kolsch Ale yeast from White Labs

This is the first time I have used three different types of hops in one brew.  All of these hops smell soooo good.  I hope that this will be delicious.

I also bottled European Ale #9 today.  It had been in a secondary fermentation carboy for a little more than 2 weeks.  I bottled European Ale #10 two days ago since I didn’t do a secondary fermentation.  I’ll be able to do a nice taste comparison since they will both be in the bottles for about the same amout of time.  The recipes were slightly different but the yeasts were the same.

Now I have quite a bit of beer in the garage!

UPDATE:  I left it in secondary for 5 weeks.  I bottled it on July 25.  We’ll see how it turns out!

This is excellent.  Very crisp and smooth.  My friends like this one.  This is probably the crispest beer I have made yet.  It also has beautiful color and a nice head.   I might not be judging fairly myself because it has been hot and cold beer is soooo good at the end of a hot day.  5:00, no earlier.

This is really good.  I think that this is my favorite recipe yet.  Note to myself.


Posted in Recipes | Leave a Comment »

Cream Ale #7 – “Memorial Day Beer”

Posted by Maggie on June 1, 2010

This is what I served at our Memorial Day party.  It was very well-liked.  Every last bottle was drunk.  This is for a 3 gallon batch (about 30 beers).

  • Specialty Malts:  .5 lb. Belgian Pale Ale, .25 lb. Crystal 40, .25 lb. Caravienna
  • 3.5 lbs. Pilsen DME
  • Hops: 1 oz. Fuggle at 60 minutes, .5 oz. Hallertaur at 10 minutes
  • Yeast:  Cream Ale Blend, White Labs WLP080

This is a medium bodied, flavorful but not bitter, sienna colored beer.  It was in primary fermentation for just shy of 2 weeks and in the bottle for three weeks before the party.  I used 3.5 oz. of priming sugar which gave it a nice level of carbonation.

Posted in Recipes | Leave a Comment »

European Ale #10

Posted by Maggie on May 28, 2010

The kids are at school, I have work to do on the computer, but I am taking a break to brew a batch of beer since we are having a Memorial Day party and I am sure that my stocks will be depleted.  I am going to move the Eurpean Ale #9, which I brewed four days ago, into a secondary fermentation bottle so that my 5 gallon carboy is free for this new batch.  I will use the yeast left at the bottom of the carboy for this next brew.

Here are the ingredients I will be using today for a 3-gallon batch:

  • Specialty Malts:  .5 lbs British Pale Ale, .5 lbs American Pale Ale (steep for an hour at about 150F)
  • 3 lbs. Light Dry Malt Extract (DME)
  • Hops:  .5 oz. Liberty at 60 minutes, .5 oz. Cascade at 5 minutes
  • European Yeast WLP 011 from the last batch.

I will report back on how it turns out.

Update:  The carboy started bubbling away in less than an hour.  That is happy yeast.  Maybe too happy.  It was a warm day and fermentation was so fast and furious that the flavor could be affected.

Actually, this is really good.  Delicious.  I was worried about the temperature but the flavor was not affected.  I am going to use this yeast strain again.


Posted in Recipes | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

My Next Beer – ‘European’ Ale #9

Posted by Maggie on May 15, 2010

Next week, I will be brewing a European Ale (so named for the yeast) with the following ingredients for a three-gallon batch:

  • Specialty Malts:  0.5 lb. Honey Malt, 0.5 lb. Caravienna
  • 3 lb. Pilsen DME (this will be a light summer beer for hot days)
  • Hops:  0.5 oz. Cascade at 60 min. and 0.5 oz. Amarillo at 10 min.
  • European Ale Yeast, White Labs 011

I suspect that the Amarillo will give it a slightly bitter finish to balance the honey malt.  Hopefully not too bitter.   I will post comments in the future on how it comes out.

Jun 26:  This sat in the primary fermenter for a week and then I racked it to a three gallon carboy and let it sit for 2 more week.  It has now been in the bottle for two weeks and is quite good.  I don’t like it as well as #7 but it is better than #10, which had the same yeast but did not have a secondary fermentation and started at a warmer temperature.

I have noticed that some of the bottles are far more carbonated than others.  Either the priming sugar was not mixed into the brew well or the yeast was uneven.

Now that the bottles have sat for longer, I think that this is just too bland.  It would be fine if you are used to Bud, but it isn’t as good as some of the other recipes I have tried.  I don’t like really hoppy ales but this isn’t hoppy enough.   Maybe the yeast also makes a blander brew.  Well, there are only a couple of bottles left so it won’t go to waste. (Only to my waist perhaps.  Ha ha ha.)

Posted in Recipes | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Truly Delicious Kolsch Ale #6

Posted by Maggie on May 10, 2010

I had dinner with some friends last night.  I brought along two different Kolsch ales I had brewed.  #6 was the preferred one.  It has only been in the bottle for four weeks.  It might get even better!  This recipe is for three gallons.

  • 3 lbs. Pilsen DME
  • Specialty Malts: 0.5 lb Belgian Pale Ale Barley, 0.5 lb Caravienna, 0.25 lb Crystal 40
  • Hops (pellets): 0.5 oz. Fuggle at 60 min. and 0.5 oz. Amarillo at 5 min.
  • Kolsch Yeast, White Labs WLP02

I used the yeast left over in the bottom of the carboy from Kolsch #5.  It started fermenting just fine.   The big difference in flavor between #5 and #6 is the hops.  The Fuggle and Amarillo hops are really nice.  The Fuggle smells so good itself in its little package.  I keep sniffing it.  I only started using it because one of my kids picked it out, due to the silly name.  Now it’s my favorite hops.


Posted in Recipes | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

A Perfect Mothers’ Day Spent Bottling and Brewing Beer

Posted by Maggie on May 9, 2010

I just spent most of Mothers’ Day bottling my last batch of beer, which had been in the carboy for one day short of two weeks, and brewing a new batch.   Mmmmm.  The wonderful smell of beer brewing.

The kids helped put the caps on the bottles and the bottles in a box.  I don’t really let them help with anything else because I like everything to be as clean as possible with no random saliva falling into the bottling bucket etc.  And the brewing is too hot for them to participate safely.

Here is the recipe for the beer I brewed today, California Ale #8.  This is a 3-gallon batch.

  • Specialty malts: 0.5 lb pale ale malt, 0.25 lbs. honey malt, 0.25 lbs caravienna
  • DME: 1 lb. pale ale, 2.5 lbs. pilsen
  • Hops:  1 oz. Hallertaur at 60 minutes and 0.5 oz. at 5 minutes
  • Yeast: California Ale, White Labs 051

I’ll see how it turns out and update.

6/6/2010  I would say that this isn’t hoppy enough.  It is really mild.  I think that it would be better with a different type of hops at 5 minutes to give it more flavor.   My friends seem to like it well enough, but this is my least favorite beer I have made.

6/19/2010.  Still not that good, so time is not helping much.  I don’t know if the problem is the recipe or maybe the fermentation temperature.  Maybe it was too warm for this yeast.  The European Ale brews will be ready for consumption in a few days.  I hope they are better.

Posted in Discussion, Recipes | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Dark Cream Ale

Posted by Maggie on May 5, 2010

This is a dark, rich, smooth cream ale.  It is similar to Cream Ale #2 except for the specialty malts.

  • Specialty Malts:  0.25 lbs Dark Roast, 0.25 lbs Crystal 10, 0.50 lbs Caravienna
  • 3 lbs Pilsen Dry Malt Extract (DME)
  • Hops: 0.75 oz. Fuggle @ 60 minutes, 0.5 oz. Hallertaur @ 5 minutes
  • Yeast: White Labs Yeast WLP080, Cream Ale Blend

Soak the specialty malts in a mesh bag in the water for at least 40 minutes, not letting the temperature raise above 160 degrees F.  Pull out the mesh bag.   You will have a nice dark “tea”.  Add the DME one cup at a time and stir, letting it fully dissolve before adding the next cup.   Bring the wort to a boil being very careful to avoid spill-over.  Keep a cup of cold water next to the pot that you can dump in if it starts to boil over.  This works better than turning off the stove.

Once a rolling boil is reached and the foam is down, add the Fuggle and look at the clock.  It should boil for 60 more minutes.  After 55 minutes, add the Hallertaur.  Let boil 5 more minutes and then remove from stove.  Stick the pot in cold water and start the cooling process.   Once the wort is adequately cool, pour into the carboy, allowing for aeration with your pour.  Add the yeast.  Most yeast comes for 5 gallon batches but you can either add it all or add 3/5th of it.  I haven’t found any difference.  Put on the air lock, put in a nice warm place, cover to keep out the light, and wait for the bubbling to start.

Posted in Recipes | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Pale Ale #1

Posted by Maggie on May 5, 2010

This is a light ale that is not too bitter yet flavorful.  It is similar to Rolling Rock.  I am not a big fan of using corn in beer, but this is a nice, refreshing, summer brew.  This recipe is for three gallons.

  • Specialty Grains:  .6 lbs. Carapils, .6 lbs flaked corn
  • 3 lbs. Pilsen Dry Malt Extract
  • Hops:  1 oz. Hallertaur @ 60 minutes, 1/2 oz. Hallertaur @ 30 minutes
  • Yeast:  Kolsch, White Lab WLP029
  • 2.5 oz. priming sugar for bottling

Soak the specialty grains in a mesh bag in the water for at least 40 minutes, not letting the temperature raise above 160 degrees F.  Pull out the mesh bag with the grains.   Add the DME one cup at a time and stir, letting it fully dissolve before adding the next cup.   Bring the wort to a boil being very careful to avoid spill-over.  Keep a cup of cold water next to the pot that you can dump in if it starts to boil over.  This works better than turning off the stove.

Once a rolling boil is reached and the foam is down, add the first oz. of Hallertaur and look at the clock.  It should boil for 60 more minutes.  After 30 minutes, add the second portion of Hallertaur.  Let boil 30 more minutes and then remove from stove.  Stick the pot in cold water and start the cooling process.   Once the wort is adequately cool, pour into the carboy, allowing for aeration with your pour.  Add the yeast.  Put on the air lock, put in a nice warm place, cover to keep out the light, and wait for the bubbling to start.

Posted in Recipes | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Kolsch Ale #5

Posted by Maggie on May 3, 2010

This is a red-amber colored beer with rich flavor and a bit of hops finish.  This recipe is for three gallons.  For directions, see Cream Ale #2 recipe.

  • Specialty Malts:  1/4 lb chocolate malt, 1/2 lb. American Pale Ale malt, 1/4 lb. crystal 77
  • 3 lbs pilsen DME
  • Yeast: White Labs WLP029 – German Ale/Kolsch
  • Hops:  1/2 oz. Centennial @ 60 minutes, 1/2 oz. Amarillo @ 10 minutes

Posted in Recipes | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.